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Catherine Holecko

When sports trump school

By January 13, 2012

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My daughter has two figure skating tests today. Through sheer luck, one was scheduled before school and the other one after, so she won't have to miss any class time. So far, we've been able to juggle skating commitments and school with very little conflict. But that certainly will change if she continues skating. Competitions are often scheduled for Fridays through Sundays, and then of course there can be travel time too. Plus there's the risk of missing school due to a sports injury.

It can happen with any sport as kids progress; some may even turn to specialized sports academies or homeschooling if they are very serious about their sport. What's your experience? Is it hard for your child to balance sports and academics? Take the poll, and share your story in the comments.

Comments
January 13, 2012 at 11:05 am
(1) Sonia Cerza says:

Living in Texas ( it’s a different kind of sports world) My kids miss for sports all of the time. However in this state, sports are implemented into the daily school schedule. My son was a wrestler, so his 5th period class was wrestling. The entire academic program is formatted to accommodate athletes. There are very few kids who are not in some form of athletics. Every Wednesday is mandatory tutoring after school. No sport practices etc.. If they have to leave for a game or tournament they usually miss 7th period or all day on Friday. It is never counted against you. You make up tests on Wednesday or whenever its convenient. CRAZY!!!!!

January 13, 2012 at 11:26 am
(2) Jackie says:

I’m a Californian and what astonishes me is this: high school sports teams routinely take their athletes out of school for the last two periods on game days and for entire days when there are big tournaments, which happens at least twice a season. Teachers seethe over it, but accept it. But when it’s the other way around and an academic commitment (an orchestra concert, for example) interferes with a sports practice – not a game, a practice! – coaches go ballistic.

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